Business FAQs

What are the system requirements for Business Mobile?

iPhone Version iO6+ operating system or Andriod Version 2.3+ of the operating system Cameras with 2.0+ Megapixel resolution and autofocus

Can businesses have e-Statements?

Yes, e-Statements are available for both business and personal banking customers who have access to Online Banking. Business customers can receive e-Statements by signing up for Business Banking Online (BBO).

For additional assistance with e-Statements or Business Banking Online, please contact UBTgo Support at (402) 323-1454 or toll free, (833) 323-1454.

What types of commercial credit does Union Bank offer?

Union Bank offers a variety of commercial credit including:

  • Loans and lines of credit greater than $150,000
  • Inventory and receivables
  • Construction and real estate
  • Machinery and equipment
  • Working capital
  • Leasehold improvements
  • Small Business Administration Loans (SBA)
  • Church financing
  • Aircraft lending
Does Basic Business Checking have a monthly fee?

Yes, a $12 fee applies if you do not maintain a $500 daily balance during the statement cycle.  

Are there transaction limits for Basic Business?

Each Basic Business and Basic Business with Interest account includes 250 free transactions per statement cycle. These transactions include deposited items, withdrawals, electronic debits and checks. If there are more than 250 transactions, a nominal transaction fee is assessed. 

Is a Business Debit Card available with Basic Business Checking?

Yes, a business debit card is available and encouraged for all business checking accounts.  There is no annual or transactions fees and the purchase detail appears on your checking statement.

Are there any business overdraft protection options?

Yes. Typically, a line of credit is an effective form of overdraft protection for businesses. Visit with a Treasury Management Officer (402-323-1557) for more details.

Can I earn interest on my Basic Business Checking account?

Yes, interest may be available on Basic Business Checking with Interest for eligible organizations.

How can employers limit risk of loss associated with early terminations?

Employers assume a level of risk similar to that the employee takes under the use-it-or-lose-it rule. Potential forfeitures offset the risk of early termination losses for many employers. Flexible plan design options allow you to limit your risk.

Can an employer charge an employee for the balance of a Health Care FSA if the employee leaves employment mid-year?

No. The Uniform Coverage Rule does not allow employers to charge an employee for the balance of an FSA if he or she terminates mid-year. The rule indicates that the maximum amount of reimbursement from a Health Care FSA must be available at all times during the coverage period. The uniform coverage rules prohibit an employer from designing a plan that ties the maximum amount of reimbursement at any time to the amount the employee has contributed. Similarly, the employee contribution payment schedule for the required amount for coverage under a Health Care FSA may not be based on the rate or amount of covered claims incurred during the coverage period. Employee salary reduction payments must not be accelerated based on the employee’s incurred claims and reimbursements.

What options does an employer have with unused FSA funds?

Employers can either use leftover funds to apply to administrative costs incurred during the plan year or adopt a Carryover option, Grace Period Extension, or Run-out Period in the Plan document.

Is a domestic partner covered under an FSA?

Medical expenses of a domestic partner who is a tax dependent of the employee are eligible for tax-free reimbursement from the employee’s health FSA. Medical expenses for a domestic partner who is not the employee’s tax dependent are not eligible for tax-free reimbursement from the employee’s health FSA, even if the employer offers domestic partner health insurance benefits.

Do non-discrimination rules apply for FSAs?

Yes. Based on requirements set by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Section 125 Cafeteria, flexible spending accounts cannot discriminate in favor of highly compensated or key employees. To ensure that employers are in compliance with these rules, nondiscrimination testing is required annually.

Can owners or partners participate in an FSA?

No. According to IRS guidelines, anyone with two percent or more ownership in a schedule S corporation, LLC, LLP, PC, sole proprietorship, or partnership may not participate. C-corporation owners and their families are eligible to participate in FSA plans because they are considered to be W-2 common law employees.

What regulations should I be aware of?

Healthcare FSAs are governed by Internal Revenue Code Section 125 when offered through a cafeteria plan. If the healthcare FSA isn’t offered through a cafeteria plan it’s subject to Internal Revenue Code Section 105. Usually they’re subject to ERISA, COBRA and HIPAA laws.

Can an FSA be offered with any health plan?

Yes. An FSA plan can be offered alongside any medical or dental plan. However, according to IRS regulations, if employees contribute to an HSA, they can only enroll in a limited-purpose FSA.

Who may contribute to an FSA?

Employees contribute to their own FSA through pretax salary deduction. You can also contribute money to your employees’ FSAs.

Who can offer an FSA plan?

Most employers can offer an FSA, with a few exceptions. You may want to check with your legal or tax advisor regarding your specific situation.

What are the different types of FSAs available?

With a healthcare FSA, your employees can pay for eligible healthcare expenses on a pre-tax basis, which reduces the amount paid for federal income tax, FICA tax and, as applicable, their state income taxes. Healthcare FSAs cover an extensive list of eligible, reimbursable expenses, as defined by IRS Code Section 213(d).

Dependent Care FSA Dependent care FSAs (DCAs) gives your employees the ability to pay for work related dependent care expenses with pretax dollars, which allows them to save on federal income tax, FICA tax and, as applicable, their state income taxes. DCAs may provide your employees more tax advantages than the federal income tax credit.

Limited-Purpose FSA If you offer an HSA-compatible high-deductible health plan paired with a health savings account (HSA), you may offer only a limited purpose FSA to those employees that have an HSA. The limited-purpose FSA is designed to complement the HSA and may be established to pay for eligible vision and dental expenses. Medical expenses are not permitted, because the tax-favored HSA is used to fund those costs.

What is a Flexible Spending Account (FSA)?

A flexible spending account (FSA) is a benefit you sponsor for your employees. A flexible spending account lets your employees set aside pre-tax dollars to pay for eligible expenses like healthcare and/or dependent care, depending on plan type.

How are HSA contributions treated for owners, shareholders, or partners?

Owners and officers with greater than two-percent share of a Subchapter S corporation, or partners in a partnership or LLC, cannot make pre-tax contributions to their HSAs by salary reduction. Any contributions made to their HSAs by the company are taxable as income. However, they can make their own personal contributions to their HSAs and claim the contributed amount as a deduction on their personal income taxes.

As an employer, am I responsible for my employees’ HSA?

No. You do not own your employees’ HSAs, nor are you responsible for how the funds are managed by the employee. The employee fully owns the contributions to the account as soon as they are deposited, just as with a personal checking or savings account to which you would deposit their compensation.

How often can an employee adjust their HSA contribution when contributing through a cafeteria plan?

Employees contributing to an HSA through a cafeteria plan may adjust their contributions at any time, as long as the change only affects future contributions.

Is the employer responsible for reviewing medical expenses?

No, the employer is not responsible for substantiating the employee’s HSA expenses. The individual account holder is responsible for determining that their account funds are being properly used and would be required to provide supporting evidence on the use of their funds if requested under IRS audit.

Can you combine an HSA with an FSA?

Yes. But only a limited-purpose FSA so as not to duplicate the coverage provided by the HSA. The limited-purpose FSA is designed to complement the HSA and may be established to pay for eligible vision and dental expenses. The FSA is not permitted to cover medical expenses because the tax-favored HSA is used to fund those costs.

Can employers make pre-tax contributions to their employees’ HSAs?

Yes. Employers may make pre-tax contributions to their employee’s HSAs with or without a section 125 plan. If an employer is making contributions without a Section 125 plan, the employer is required to make comparable HSA contributions for all eligible employees with the same category of coverage. Employers often utilize a Section 125 plan to avoid the comparability rules on their HSA contributions. Employer HSA contributions through a Section 125 plan are not subject to the comparability rules, but rather to Section 125 nondiscrimination rules regarding eligibility, contributions and benefits tests, and key employee concentration tests. Nondiscrimination rules restrict employers from making contributions excessively in favor of highly compensated employees. Employers typically use a section 125 plan to offer matching contributions to their employees and to save payroll taxes (7.65%) on all employee contributions.

Are an employer’s contributions to an HSA treated as a deductible health care expenses?

The tax treatment of employer HSA contributions depends on how the business is incorporated. For sole proprietors, partnerships, and S-corporations, contributions to a partner’s HSA will be treated as a distribution to the partner and included in the partner’s income and may be deductible by the partner but not by the business (see IRS Notice 2005-8 for treatment of HSA contributions in exchange for guaranteed payments of services rendered for partners and two percent shareholder employees of S-corporations). For larger corporations, employer contributions are treated as employer-provided coverage for medical expenses under an accident or health plan.

May an employer fully fund the employee’s HSA at the beginning of the year?

Yes. An employer may fully fund the employee’s HSA at the beginning of the year, however HSAs belong to the individual and not the employer and the employer has no further control over the accounts after they have been funded. As a result, many employers elect to fund employee’s HSAs periodically throughout the year.

Does an employer have to make contributions to an employee’s HSA?

No. Employers are under no obligation to make any contributions to their employees’ HSAs. Many employers find that contributing to employees’ HSA accounts may help improve adoption of HDHPs and HSAs, especially if they are transitioning from a more traditional type of health coverage.

Do employees get a tax benefit from an HSA?

Employee contributions to an HSA can be made by payroll deductions or personal deposits. When an employee makes contributions through a payroll deduction and is ran through a Section 125 plan (also called a salary reduction or cafeteria plan) these dollar are pre-tax, including social security tax. If employees make personal deposits into their HSA it is on a post tax basis. The amount can be deducted from their taxable income but they will not recover the social security tax.

Is a high-deductible plan really less expensive for the business?

Yes. High-deductible health plan premiums are much lower than the typical HMO and PPO premiums. Many businesses are finding these health plans affordable for their companies and their employees.

What is a high-deductible health plan (HDHP?)

An HDHP is a health insurance plan that offers higher deductibles and lower premiums than a traditional health insurance plan. With an HDHP, the annual deductible must be met before plan benefits are paid for services. In order for an HDHP to be paired with a Health Savings Account, it must meet the following requirements.

IRS Guidelines for a qualified HDHP:

Year Annual Deductible Out-of-Pocket Expenses
2019 At least $1,350 for individual coverage and $2,700 for family coverage Not exceeding $6,750 for individual coverage and $13,500 for family coverage
2020 At least $1,400 for individual coverage and $2,800 for family coverage Not exceeding $6,900 for individual coverage and $13,800 for family coverage
Who is eligible to open an HSA?

If an employee meets all the criteria listed below, they are eligible to open and contribute to an HSA:

  • Are covered by a qualified high-deductible health plan (QHDHP) on the first day of a given month;
  • Are not covered by another health care plan, such as a health plan sponsored by your spouse’s employer;
  • Are not enrolled in Medicare, Medicaid or TriCare;
  • Have not received VA benefits at any time during the preceding three months. However, if you are a veteran with a service-connected disability, this exclusion does not apply;
  • Are not claimed as a dependent on another individual's tax return;

*Other exceptions & restrictions may apply. Please consult a tax or legal professional to discuss your personal circumstances.

What is a Health Savings Account (HSA)?

A Health Savings Account (HSA) is a tax-advantaged benefit account that allows you to save and pay for qualified medical expenses.

Unused HSA dollars roll over from year to year, making HSAs a convenient and easy way to save and invest for future medical expenses. Employee’s own their HSA at all times and can take it with them when they change medical plans, change jobs or retire.

Is this really less expensive for the business?

Yes. High-deductible health plan premiums are much lower than the typical HMO and PPO premiums. Many businesses are finding these health plans affordable for their companies and their employees.

Do employees get a tax benefit from an HSA?

Employee contributions to an HSA can be made by payroll deductions or personal deposits. When an employee makes contributions through a payroll deduction and is ran through a Section 125 plan (also called a salary reduction or cafeteria plan) these dollar are pre-tax, including social security tax. If employees make personal deposits into their HSA it is on a post tax basis. The amount can be deducted from their taxable income but they will not recover the social security tax.

How can a patient account financing program improve our cash flow?

There are several components that will save your staff time and effort:

  • Immediate account resolution via ACH
  • Decrease A/R days and bad debt
  • Eliminate additional expense of collecting accounts in-house
What patient account financing reports are available to us?

On a monthly basis you will receive:

  • Outstanding volume summary report 
  • Account-level information on new loans and repurchases sent daily
  • Analysis on the YTD repurchases and delinquent accounts
What are the advantages to my patients?

A patient account financing program helps your patients in the following ways: 

  • Manageable monthly payments
  • Patients able to add to their existing loan
  • Every patient is treated with a high level of respect and integrity
What is UBT's Wire SWIFT Code for receiving an international wire?

SWIFT Code: UNTUUS42

To assist our customers living abroad or with family members who live outside of the United States, we have an International Wire SWIFT Code. Use the information below to send a wire to a Union Bank & Trust account:

  1. Receiving Bank: Union Bank & Trust Co.
  2. SWIFT Code: UNTUUS42
  3. Beneficiary: Union Bank & Trust Co. Account Name
  4. Address: Union Bank & Trust Co. Account Address
  5. Account Number: Union Bank & Trust Co. Account Number